Monsanto’s Roundup. Enough to Make You Sick.

Monsanto used to manufacture DDT (until it was banned in 1972 after 20 years on the market). Then Monsanto started manufacturing Roundup in 1974. Roundup is Glyphosate. Glyphosate is a poison. Glyphosate is sprayed on crops to kill weeds.

Monsanto has now genetically-engineered Glyphosate into the DNA of seeds that grow the food we eat (GMOs).

Not Salad DressingIf you want to know how this is affecting your health, please read the following article I have re-posted by Alexis Baden-Mayer at the Organic Consumers Association.

Monsanto invented the herbicide glyphosate and brought it to market under the trade name Roundup in 1974, after DDT was banned. But it wasn’t until the late 1990s that the use of Roundup surged, thanks to Monsanto’s ingenious marketing strategy. The strategy? Genetically engineer seeds to grow food crops that could tolerate high doses of Roundup. With the introduction of these new GE seeds, farmers could now easily control weeds on their corn, soy, cotton, canola, sugar beets and alfalfa crops–crops that thrived while the weeds around them were wiped out by Roundup.

Eager to sell more of its flagship herbicide, Monsanto also encouraged farmers to use Roundup as a dessicant, to dry out all of their crops so they could harvest them faster. So Roundup is now routinely sprayed directly on a host of non-GMO crops, including wheat, barley, oats, canola, flax, peas, lentils, soybeans, dry beans and sugar cane.
Between 1996 – 2011, the widespread use of Roundup Ready GMO crops increased herbicide use in the U.S. by 527 million pounds—even though Monsanto claimed its GMO crops would reduce pesticide and herbicide use.

Monsanto has falsified data on Roundup’s safety, and marketed it to parks departments and consumers as “environmentally friendly” and “biodegradable,” to encourage its use it on roadsides, playgrounds, golf courses, schoolyards, lawns and home gardens. A French court ruled those marketing claims amounted to false advertising.

In the nearly 20 years of intensifying exposure, scientists have been documenting the health consequences of Roundup and glyphosate in our food, in the water we drink, in the air we breathe and where our children play.

They’ve found that people who are sick have higher levels of glyphosate in their bodies than healthy people.

They’ve also found the following health problems which they attribute to exposure to Roundup and/or glyphosate:

ADHD: In farming communities, there’s a strong correlation between Roundup exposure and attention deficit disorder (ADHD), likely due to glyphosate’s capacity to disrupt thyroid hormone functions.

Alzheimer’s disease: In the lab, Roundup causes the same type of oxidative stress and neural cell death observed in Alzheimer’s disease. And it affects CaMKII, an enzyme whose dysregulation has also been linked to the disease.

Anencephaly (birth defect): An investigation into neural tube defects among babies born to women living within 1,000 meters of pesticide applications showed an association for glyphosate with anencephaly, the absence of a major portion of the brain, skull and scalp that forms during embryonic development.

Autism: Glyphosate has a number of known biological effects that align with the known pathologies associated with autism. One of these parallels is the gut dysbiosis observed in autistic children and the toxicity of glyphosate to beneficial bacteria that suppress pathogenic bacteria, along with pathogenic bacteria’s high resistance to glyphosate. In addition, glyphosate’s capacity to promote aluminum accumulation in the brain may make it the principal cause of autism in the U.S.

Birth defects: Roundup and glyphosate can disrupt the Vitamin A (retinoic acid) signaling pathway, which is crucial for normal fetal development. The babies of women living within one kilometer of fields sprayed with glyphosate were more than twice as likely to have birth defects according to a study from Paraguay. Congenital defects quadrupled in the decade after Roundup Ready crops arrived in Chaco, a province in Argentina where glyphosate is used roughly eight to ten times more per acre than in the U.S. A study of one farming family in the U.S. documented elevated levels of glyphosate and birth defects in the children, including an imperforate anus, growth hormone deficiency, hypospadias (an abnormally placed urinary hole), a heart defect and a micro penis.

Brain cancer: In a study of children with brain cancer compared with healthy children, researchers found that if either parent had been exposed to Roundup during the two years before the child’s birth, the chances of the child developing brain cancer doubled.
Breast cancer: Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors. The only long-term animal study of glyphosate exposure produced rats with mammary tumors and shortened life-spans.

Cancer: House-to-house surveys of 65,000 people in farming communities in Argentina where Roundup is used, known there as the fumigated towns, found cancer rates two to four times higher than the national average, with increases in breast, prostate and lung cancers. In a comparison of two villages, in the one where Roundup was sprayed, 31 percent of residents had a family member with cancer, while only 3 percent of residents in a ranching village without spraying had one. The high cancer rates among people exposed to Roundup likely stem from glyphosate’s known capacity to induce DNA damage, which has been demonstrated in numerous lab tests.

Celiac disease and gluten intolerance: Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. There are parallels between the characteristics of celiac disease and the known effects of glyphosate. These include imbalances in gut bacteria, impairment in enzymes involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, mineral deficiencies and amino acid depletion.

Chronic kidney disease: Increases in the use of glyphosate may explain the recent surge in kidney failure among agricultural workers in Central America, Sri Lanka and India. Scientists have concluded, “Although glyphosate alone does not cause an epidemic of chronic kidney disease, it seems to have acquired the ability to destroy the renal tissues of thousands of farmers when it forms complexes with [hard water] and nephrotoxic metals.”

Colitis: The toxicity of glyphosate to beneficial bacteria that suppress clostridia, along with clostridia’s high resistance to glyphosate, could be a significant predisposing factor in the overgrowth of clostridia. Overgrowth of clostridia, specifically C. difficile, is a well-established causal factor in colitis.

Depression: Glyphosate disrupts chemical processes that impact the production of serotonin, an important neurotransmitter that regulates mood, appetite and sleep. Serotonin impairment has been linked to depression.

Diabetes: Low levels of testosterone are a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. Rats fed environmentally relevant doses of Roundup over a period of 30 days spanning the onset of puberty had reduced testosterone production sufficient to alter testicular cell morphology and to delay the onset of puberty.

Heart disease: Glyphosate can disrupt the body’s enzymes, causing lysosomal dysfunction, a major factor in cardiovascular disease and heart failure.
Hypothyroidism: House-to-house surveys of 65,000 people in farming communities in Argentina where Roundup is used, known there as the fumigated towns, found higher rates of hypothyroidism.

Inflammatory Bowl Disease (“Leaky Gut Syndrome”): Glyphosate can induce severe tryptophan deficiency, which can lead to an extreme inflammatory bowel disease that severely impairs the ability to absorb nutrients through the gut, due to inflammation, bleeding and diarrhea.

Liver disease: Very low doses of Roundup can disrupt human liver cell function, according to a 2009 study published in Toxicology.

Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS): Sulfate deficiency in the brain has been associated with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Glyphosate disrupts sulfate transport from the gut to the liver, and may lead over time to severe sulfate deficiency throughout all the tissues, including the brain.Multiple Sclerosis (MS): An increased incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBS) has been found in association with MS. Glyphosate may be a causal factor. The hypothesis is that glyphosate-induced IBS causes gut bacteria to leak into the vasculature, triggering an immune reaction and consequently an autoimmune disorder resulting in destruction of the myelin sheath.

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma: A systematic review and a series of meta-analyses of nearly three decades worth of epidemiologic research on the relationship between non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and occupational exposure to agricultural pesticides found that B cell lymphoma was positively associated with glyphosate.

Parkinson’s disease: The brain-damaging effects of herbicides have been recognized as the main environmental factor associated with neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease. The onset of Parkinson’s following exposure to glyphosate has been well documented and lab studies show that glyphosate induces the cell death characteristic of the disease.

Pregnancy problems (infertility, miscarriages, stillbirths): Glyphosate is toxic to human placental cells, which, scientists say, explains the pregnancy problems of agricultural workers exposed to the herbicide.

Obesity: An experiment involving the transfer of a strain of endotoxin-producing bacteria from the gut of an obese human to the guts of mice caused the mice to become obese. Since glyphosate induces a shift in gut bacteria towards endotoxin-producers, glyphosate exposure may contribute to obesity in this way.

Reproductive problems: Studies of laboratory animals have found that male rats exposed to high levels of glyphosate, either during prenatal or pubertal development, suffer from reproductive problems, including delayed puberty, decreased sperm production, and decreased testosterone production.

Respiratory illnesses: House-to-house surveys of 65,000 people in farming communities in Argentina where Roundup is used, known there as the fumigated towns, found higher rates of chronic respiratory illnesses.

Would you knowingly take a tablespoon of Monsanto’s Roundup poison with every meal? I would hope not.  However, you are probably eating those foods that have been genetically-engineered to include Roundup poison and have also been topically treated with Roundup poison as well. If you are eating the following GMO food products, and/or food products with these as an ingredient (GMO), then you are getting your daily dose of Roundup poison…

In case you aren’t sure which products are GMO, below is a list of the top Genetically Modified and Genetically Engineered Foods by Monsanto.

Top 10 GMOs

Monsanto’s GMO Bt Corn – Egyptian Study Proves It’s Dangerous

GMO fed to rats in EgyptIndependent Egyptian scientists have found that Monsanto’s GMO Bt toxic corn is NOT substantially equivalent to its NON GMO parent. While Monsanto claims there is no evidence of toxicity in their voluntary safety assessments, these independent scientists will tell you otherwise. By the 91st day of their studies, they found evidence of kidney, liver & intestinal toxicity, as well as male infertility. Time to face the music, Monsanto! BOYCOTT GMOs!

[Source:  www.gmofreeusa.org ]

Bad news for the “GMOs industry” … advances in 2013!!

What’s wrong with us America? The rest of the world knows how dangerous and unknown GMO and Monsanto are, and they are banning it. But In America, we just want to have our food labeled as GMO so we can make our own decision to eat it or not. As this video says, if it’s not dangerous why are they spending millions in each state to NOT LABEL it as GMO???

It Is What It Is

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As 2013 comes to a close, we’d like to wish each and everyone one of you a Happy & Healthy GMO Free 2014! As the movement grows, we have much to celebrate, and still much more to get done. Everyone has their Top Ten lists. What is yours?
GreenGB
Here are our Top Ten picks for 2013:
1. Kellogg’s U.S. sales down for 2 quarters because of GMO boycott
2. Hawaii Big Island passes Bill 113 to ban GMO cultivati…on
3. Kauai passes Bill 2491 for GMO & pesticide disclosure and buffer zones
4. Monsanto Protection Act terminated by Congress
5. 2 million people participate in Global March Against Monsanto
6. Connecticut & Maine pass conditional GMO labeling bills
7. Mexico bans GMO corn and throws out Monsanto appeal
8. E.U. bans 4 neonicotinoid pesticides responsible for bee deaths
9. Whole Foods announces mandatory GMO labeling by 2018
10. Chipotle Restaurants announces…

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Why Are We Killing These Angels of Nature?

I am sure that most of you have gone through life without giving a second thought about honeybees. Yes, everyone knows they live in a bee hive and make honey, which beekeepers collect and sells in jars at your favorite grocery store or farmers market. But very few understand the important role that these Angels of Nature play in our life.

So, please read on and I will share some interesting facts, tid-bits, and beautiful images of honeybees and how we are putting them, and ourselves, in danger.

The practice of honey collection and beekeeping can be traced back to the stone-age, as evidenced by cave paintings.

Honey BeeThe honeybee is the only insect that produces food that human beings eat. Honey is the only food that includes all the substances necessary to sustain life, including vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and water.

honey-bee 4The world’s agriculture depends on the honeybee for pollination, which accounts for 80% of all insect pollination. Without pollination, there would be a major decrease in the yield of fruits and vegetables.

Honey Bee 2The honeybees make honey from the nectar they collect from flowering trees and plants.  The average worker bee produces about 1/12th teaspoon of honey in her lifetime. Honeybees collect 66 lbs of pollen per year, per hive. A hive of bees will fly 90,000 miles, the equivalent of three orbits around the earth to collect 1 kg of honey.

Honey Bee on Lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All honeybees are social and cooperative insects. A hive’s inhabitants are generally divided into three types:

Workers are the only bees that most people ever see. These bees are females that are not sexually developed. Workers forage for food (pollen and nectar from flowers), build and protect the hive, clean, circulate air by beating their wings, and perform many other societal functions.

The Queen lays the eggs that will spawn the hive’s next generation of bees. There is usually only a single queen in a hive. Queens also regulate the hive’s activities by producing chemicals that guide the behavior of the other bees.

Drones are male bees — the third class of honeybee. These drones are kept on standby during the summer for mating with the queen. Several hundred drones live in each hive during the spring and summer, but they are expelled for the winter months when the hive goes into a lean survival mode.

Bees live on stored honey and pollen all winter, and cluster into a ball to conserve warmth. Larvae are fed from the stores during this season and, by spring, the hive is swarming with a new generation of bees.

honey-bee 3Honeybees are not aggressive by nature, and will not sting unless protecting their hive from an intruder or are unduly provoked.  Honeybees represent a highly organized society, with various bees having very specific roles during their lifetime: e.g., nurses, guards, grocers, housekeepers, construction workers, royal attendants, undertakers, foragers, etc.  The queen bee can live for several years. Worker bees live for 6 weeks during the busy summer, and for 4-9 months during the winter months.

The honeybee hive is perennial. Although quite inactive during the winter, the honeybee survives the winter months by clustering for warmth. By self-regulating the internal temperature of the cluster, the bees maintain 93 degrees Fahrenheit in the center of the winter cluster (regardless of the outside temperature).

Roundup SprayingWe have to help the honeybees. Our food supply and the balance of nature depends on these small-winged Angels of Nature.  A quarter of our food depends on them collecting and spreading pollen. Yet we are polluting our environment with so many pesticides and toxins that the honeybees can’t survive.

Honeybees have thrived for 50 million years, each colony 40 to 50,000 individuals coordinated in amazing harmony. So why, seven years ago, did colonies start dying en masse? Marla Spivak reveals four reasons which are interacting with tragic consequences. This is not simply a problem because bees pollinate a third of the world’s crops. Could this incredible species be holding up a mirror for us?

Please click on the link below to learn more…

http://www.ted.com/talks/marla_spivak_why_bees_are_disappearing.html

[ Sources: National Geographic, benefits-of-honey.com, backyardbeekeepers.com, Maria Spivak ]

6 Sources of Toxic Chemicals in our Food

Roundup SprayingFor a country with supposedly the best, and most expensive, health care in the world, do you know why the U.S. ranks so high in a broad range of diseases?

Toxic chemicals in our food.

Most of our country’s food supply system has become extremely commercialized, with the majority of our food being mass-produced, highly processed, and packaged using greater amounts of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, antibiotics, hormones, and toxic packaging.

Our pesticide-rich, fertilizer-driven food production system has a significant impact on our exposure to toxic chemicals. Antibiotics and hormones support the mass production of eggs, chicken, milk, and beef. Fertilizers and phosphates flow to our rivers and lakes, contaminating them.  Chemical food flavorings and colors, some of which affect children’s behavior, are added to foods to encourage consumption. Pesticides including neurotoxins remain as residues on food and are subsequently ingested and metabolized by people. Plastic and paper packaging may leach toxic chemicals into food.

exterminator

So, where do the majority of the chemicals in our food come from?

1. Chemicals and Drugs used in raising livestock: Researchers feel that this is probably the biggest problem and none of these are required to appear on the label. Over 70% of all antibiotics used in the USA are used in raising livestock to prevent infection because the animals are kept in cramped inhumane conditions. Steroids are also given to increase milk production and speed growth. The feed given to these animals is also full of chemicals, and pesticides and chemicals accumulate in the fat of these animals that we then eat.

 2. Chemicals used in pesticides and fertilizers:  Although the use of pesticides has made our food production more efficient, it has placed an enormous toxic burden on us and the earth. U.S. pesticide use currently stands at about 1.2 billion pounds per year. FDA inspections have found legal residues on two thirds of food sampled, therefore these pesticides remain on our food. Pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of the reproductive function in adult females and are associated with adverse outcomes that occur throughout the lifespan of both males and females. There is concern on many levels about the overuse of pesticides and their effects on our public health, from the farm workers and their families who are exposed to pesticides directly in their work and in their communities, to residents who live in drift areas near agricultural fields where pesticides are regularly applied to crops and soils, and to consumers who increase the amount of pesticides in their bodies by consuming fruits and vegetables with pesticide residues.

 3.  Chemicals used in the production of our food:  Over 12,000 chemicals are used in the production of our food. Many are used intentionally as “direct” additives, but some are “indirect” contaminants or used accidentally. The food industry uses about 3,000 different food additives in various packaged and preserved foods. These include (preservatives), emulsifiers, buffers, natural and artificial colorings and flavorings.

 4. Chemicals we create in processing foods:  Trans fats or hydrogenated fats would be the commonest.

 5. Contaminants associated with processing of foods:  During shipping and storage, chemical cleaners, food sprays and fungicides are used.

 6. Chemicals absorbed into our food from the way we cook, store and serve our food:  Non stick pans, pots, bake-ware and utensils contain Teflon, which is made from perfluorinated compounds which have been linked to cancer and reproductive problems.

And please remember this is only a list of chemicals in our food, not our water and personal care products, which are also full of chemicals. This also does not take into account the impact of genetically modified foods (GMO).

The food products we used to buy fresh at the local grocery were provided by local farmers or co-ops. These food products are now provided by large, corporate conglomerates that are only in it for the money. In many cases, the food they supply has been processed at high temperatures, irradiated or pasteurized to make sure no living organisms survive, and then “fortified” with ingredients that most of us can’t pronounce.  In the process, much of the nutrients and enzymes that our bodies crave are lost, or at least severely compromised.

Think about it. Your diet plays an instrumental role in a wide range of health conditions and it’s a known fact that many diseases are linked to eating habits. So, not only do we not eat healthy, but we’re knowingly eating chemical-laden foods and not giving a second thought as to what it is doing to our body and mind.

“The greatest wealth is health”. –Virgil

Sources:

http://www.drfranklipman.com/where-do-the-chemicals-in-our-food-come-from/

http://www.psr.org/environment-and-health/environmental-health-policy-institute/topics-archive.html